Posted on Leave a comment

How to quilt stacked swirls

how to quilt stacked swirls

Good Monday morning! I’m so excited to share a new video tutorial with you this morning. I just LOVE to quilt stacked swirls in the background of quilt blocks and in negative space. They create amazing texture and fill up a space without a lot of thought and concentration. This video will show you how to quilt stacked swirls and how to navigate to the spaces you want to quilt.

Continue reading How to quilt stacked swirls
Posted on 12 Comments

Learn how to quilt swirls – video tutorial

smoky swirls video tutorial

Want to learn how to quilt swirls? Sometimes it’s difficult to determine what should go in the negative space of a quilt. I really like using swirls to quilt empty space because it gives texture and movement. It can also double as smoky swirls or wind looking swirls to create a darker look, or mimic the weather.

Continue reading Learn how to quilt swirls – video tutorial
Posted on 1 Comment

Typecast English Paper Piecing

Have you guys seen Sheri of Whole Circle Studio’s newest pattern? It’s called the Typecast of Characters, and it’s an amazingly fun English Paper Piecing pattern that lets you create the entire alphabet and customize it to your heart’s desire. You can snag your copy of the pattern guide and paper packs here.

Continue reading Typecast English Paper Piecing
Posted on Leave a comment

How to quilt feathers – video tutorial

Have you ever been at a loss for how to fill negative space in a quilt? I know I’ve sometimes struggled with what quilting motif is the right one, and I wanted to share some of the fills I use the most. I made a quick video tutorial on how to quilt feathers and I think you’ll really love some of the tips I give in it 🙂

Continue reading How to quilt feathers – video tutorial
Posted on Leave a comment

Binding on the Longarm

Do you follow me on instagram? If you do, you might have seen I’ve been having a LOT of fun with videos lately. I’ve been doing some time lapse videos of some basic straight line quilting AAAAAND decided I’d do a real time video of how I bind mini quilts on my longarm. It’s seriously so easy that if you haven’t tried this yet, you’ll really kick yourself!

If you’ve ever quilted a mini quilt on the longarm, there’s a fun shortcut you can use to quickly attach binding to the front of the quilt after you quilt it. I did a short video tutorial showing how to attach binding on the longarm, and I hope you’ll go check it out! Now just a quick note…I am obviously not a professional videographer…or whatever that’s called, and I even treat you to a view of my gorgeous locks of hair that were quickly and haphazardly thrown up into a very unglamorous mom bun. That’s right. ENJOOOOOY 😉

When I bind my quilting samples on the longarm, I usually stick to pretty small sizes. You could definitely do this with a large quilt, just keep in mind that you’ll be doing some scrolling and advancing of the quilt to finish the job. It’s also a good idea to mark the large quilt so you have a good idea of where the squared portion of the quilt will be so you attach the binding straight. I only do this for quilts that are for myself–because for me this is something to do quickly as a shortcut and not great for accuracy, as I don’t spend a lot of time making sure I’m putting the binding on squarely.

To make the binding, I cut strips 2.5″ wide x the width of the fabric and then sew them together, end to end to create the length I need (I usually do the perimeter of the quilt + 12″ to make sure I have enough). The tutorial shows how to attach the binding to the front of the quilt. After quilting, you’ll need to trim away and square up, then flip the folded edge of the binding to the back and finish. I finish all mine by hand because I’m a weirdo and love hand binding!

Freshly bound mini quilt!

Binding on the longarm details

I’m using an Innova 22″ longarm (hand guided) with a lightning stitch stitch regulator. The fabric panel I quilted was a custom panel I ordered from My Fabric Design, and the thread I used for the quilting was Glide by Hab+Dash (previously Fil-Tec). If you’d like to see a time lapse video of the quilting of this panel, you can check it out on instagram HERE.

I hope you find this tutorial helpful–and I’d love to hear your feedback! Are you up for trying this out soon? Let me know if you do and how it goes! Happy sewing 🙂

Posted on 4 Comments

Easy Zip Pouch Tutorial

OLFA is celebrating their 40th Anniversary this year and has teamed up with Aurifil to create the Slice and Stitch Challenge! I was asked to be part of the challenge, and I’m so excited to included in this talented group of makers, showing you how to use handy tools to create things you’ll love :). I don’t know about you, but if you sneak into my sewing room, you’re sure to find several OLFA tools (and cutting mats) and LOTS of yummy Aurifil thread. Some of my favorite (and quite possibly underappreciated) tools are specialty rotary cutter blades. You can (carefully) pop one of these blades into your regular rotary cutter and quickly achieve a decorative finish that will look like it took you forever to cut…but that can be our little secret! I also just LOVE the new OLFA RUBY rotary cutter…I use it daily (photos below are from OLFA’s website). For the Slice and Stitch challenge, I saw those decorative blades paired with Aurifloss and knew immediately I just had to make a zip pouch!

You can see the dreamy Aurifloss colors I chose for the hand quilting on my zip pouch. Love those blues with a punch of bright colors! Let’s get moving and start sewing up your own zip pouch!

Exact Aurifloss colors are listed below

Supplies needed:

  • Zip pouch template, printed at 100%
  • 10″ zipper
  • Aurifloss in your favorite colors (I used #1320 Bright teal, 2225 Salmon, 2220 Light salmon, 4020 Fucshia, 5005 Bright turquoise, 2735 Medium blue, 1147 Leaf green, and 4644 Smoke blue)
  • OLFA 45 mm Wave rotary blade and OLFA 45 mm Deluxe Handle Rotary Cutter
  • (2) 2.5″ x 9.5″ pieces of cork leather
  • Hand quilting needle
  • 1 FQ lining fabric, sub cut into
    • (2) 6.5″ x 9.5″
  • 1 FQ Solid fabric for the exterior, sub cut into
    • (2) 6.5″ x 9.5″
  • (2) 8″ x 11″ pieces of batting
  • Binding Clips
  • Turning tool (optional)
  • Basting spray/safety pins
  • Chalk marker or Hera marker
  • Zipper foot, sewing machine
  • Thread for piecing and basic sewing supplies
  • Iron and pressing mat

Hand Quilt it!

To begin, you’ll need to take the two exterior pieces of fabric cut at 6.5″ x 9.5″ and center each one on top of a piece of batting. Use a Hera marker or chalk pencil to mark your hand quilting lines, then hand quilt a pattern or random stitches onto each exterior piece. I like to make my stitches about 1/4″ in length, and spaced the same distance apart.

Grab your template:

Now you’ll take the cork pieces, and the bottom portion of the template printed from your supply list and line the template up along the bottom 9.5″ of the cork. Use a standard OLFA 45 mm Rotary blade to trim along the curved edge. I used my OLFA Ruby Rotary Cutter for this part. Once you’ve trimmed the curved portion, take the Wave Rotary blade and trim just along the curved edge to leave a cute wavy edge.

Take one of the quilted exterior pieces and place the decorative cork on the bottom 9.5″ edge. Use clips to hold in place, or use some wash away hem tape to secure. At this point, I like to take an air erasable marker and echo the line of the wave just below the wavy edge of the cork – about 1/8″ from the curvy edge – as a stitching guide. Take this piece to the sewing machine and topstitch along the guideline you drew with a coordinating thread. Then stitch around the remaining edges of the cork, about 1/8″ away from the raw edge to secure it in place. Don’t worry — the cork won’t fray, so it’s great for special decorative finishes with the OLFA rotary cutter!

Take your zipper and place it lined up with the top edge of one exterior, as shown in the picture below. Mark the end of the zipper (the end with the metal stopper) where it meets the end of the right side of the fabric, then mark about 1/4″ in from that mark as well. Take the zipper to the sewing machine and use a zig zag stitch to sew a new zipper stop on the mark furthest in. Trim away the rest of the zipper on the outermost mark.

Install the zipper

Take the newly trimmed down zipper and place it RSD on top of one side of the hand quilted exterior. Use binding clips to clip the zipper in place. Take one of the lining pieces and place it RSD on top of the zipper, the replace the clips to include all three layers. Use a zipper foot to sew through the three layers with a 1/4″ seam allowance, beginning at one end of the fabric and sewing to the opposite end, all the way to the edge of the fabric.

Press the lining and exterior away from the zipper with your iron, and topstitch 1/8″ away from the folded edge of the fabric.

Repeat the steps above with the remaining exterior and lining pieces.

Assembling the zip pouch

Open the zipper part way, then match the exteriors, placing them right sides together. Pull the linings together and match them, right sides together. Pin or clip in place, and mark about a 5″ opening along the bottom center of the lining to leave open in the next step. Pull the zipper pieces towards the lining, as shown below.

Sew all the way around the perimeter of the zipper pouch, leaving the 5″ opening unsewn. Clip the corners for crisp turning. Turn the zipper pouch right side out through the opening in the lining. You can use a turning tool for crisper turning, if needed. Fold the opening of the lining in 1/4″ and press. Clip in place. Topstitch the opening closed, then push the lining down inside the pouch.

And you’re done! Fill this pretty pouch up with all the sewing things you need on the go 🙂

Posted on 2 Comments

Total Eclipse Heart Pouch Tutorial

Grab your copy of the Total Eclipse Heart Block and check out this free zip pouch tutorial to turn it into a quick and easy zippered pouch for some serious cuteness!

Total Eclipse Heart Block
Total Eclipse Heart Block in Tula Pink’s Tabby Road and Michael Miller Hashdot

Supplies

  • Supplies/fabrics listed in the Total Eclipse Heart Block pattern – we’ll be making the 7″ x 12″ block.
  • Additional fabric cuts:
    • (2) 1.5″ x 4″ zipper ends cut from exterior fabric
    • (2) 7.5″ x 12.5″ lining for zip pouch
    • (2) 7.5″ x 12.5″ pieces of SF101 fusible interfacing for the lining
    • (1) 7.5″ x 12.5″ for Exterior back of pouch (cut this at 8.5″ x 13.5″ if you plan to quilt it, then trim down to 7.5″ x 12.5″. You may also want to alter your border pieces on the Total Eclipse Heart Block and cut them at (2″ x 5.5″ and 2″ x 13.5″) if you’re quilting the front exterior or the quilt block.)
      • If quilting, you’ll also need (2) 10″ x 15″ batting pieces.
      • If not quilting, cut (2) 7.5″ x 12.5″ pieces of SF101 fusible interfacing for the exterior.
  • 14″ closed end nylon zipper
  • Erasable marking tool (I like to use Frixion pens)
  • Turning tool or chopstick

Instructions

  • To begin, follow the instructions in the Total Eclipse Heart Block pattern to make the 7″ x 12″ block. You’ll need to decide if you want to quilt your zipper pouch or not.
    • If quilting – cut the border pieces at (2) 2″ x 5.5″ and (2) 2″ x 13.5″, instead of the 1.5″ width to give a little extra room for shrinkage. Then sew the pieces on as directed.
    • Make a quilt sandwich, using 2 pieces of scrap fabric (these won’t be seen in the finished pouch) measuring 10″ x 15″ as the back of your quilt sandwich. Place the scrap piece wrong side up, place the batting piece on top of that, then center the 8.5″ x 13.5″ block on top of that and baste the layers together using your favorite method. Make another quilt sandwich with the 8.5″ x 13.5″ Exterior back piece. Quilt as desired, then square up the quilted pieces to measure 7.5″ x 12.5″.
  • If not quilting – Follow the cutting/sewing instructions to make the block, then apply the fusible interfacing to the wrong side of the 7.5″ x 12.5″ quilt block, following the manufacturer’s instructions. Do the same for the 7.5″ x 12.5″ Exterior back of pouch.
    • Apply the fusible interfacing to the wrong side of each lining piece.
    • Take the 1.5″ x 4″ zipper end pieces and fold the 1.5″ ends to meet in the center. Press. Fold them in once more to conceal all raw edges and press.
  • Take the 14″ zipper and move the zipper pull in away from the metal teeth a little. Trim your zipper down to measure exactly 12.5″, and make sure you trim the metal bits off when you trim it down. Be very careful to not pull your zipper head off.
  • Take the zipper end pieces and place one end of the zipper butted into the middle of the folded piece. Use clips or pin in place. Repeat for the other end of the zipper. Take to your sewing machine and topstitch 1/8″ from the folded edge to contain the zipper. Trim away the edges of the zipper pieces so they’re even with the zipper tape.
  • Measure and mark the center top 12.5″ edges of all 4 of your fabric pieces. Measure and mark the center of the zipper.

Assembling the Zipper pouch

  • Take the assembled quilt block (quilted or not) and place it right side up. Take the zipper and place it right side down, lining up the centers and the edge of the zipper tape to the top edge of the block. Use clips or pin to secure. Place one lining piece right side down on top of the zipper, sandwiching the zipper between the two layers and matching the centers again. Clip or pin in place. Use a zipper foot to sew through all three layers with a 1/4″ seam allowance. Press the fabrics wrong sides together away from the zipper and topstitch 1/8″ from the folded edge of the fabric.
  • Take the exterior 7.5″ x 12.5″ piece (quilted or not) and place it
    right side up. Take the zipper (now attached to the quilt block) and place it right side down, lining up the centers and the edge of the zipper tape to the top edge of the block. Use clips or pin to secure. Place the remaining lining piece right side down on top of the zipper, sandwiching the zipper between the two layers and matching the centers again. Clip or pin in place. Use a zipper foot to sew through all three layers with a 1/4″ seam allowance. Press the fabrics wrong sides together away from the zipper and topstitch 1/8″ from the folded edge of the fabric.
  • Open the zipper. Pull the exteriors and linings apart from eachother and pin the edges of the exterior RST. Do the same with the lining pieces. Pin or clip in place. Mark a 5″ opening centered on the bottom of the lining. This will be left open for turning. Start sewing with your regular pressing foot, and sew all the way around the zip pouch, leaving the opening unsewn.
  • Trim the corners away being careful not to clip the stitches. Turn the bag right side out through the opening in the lining and push the corners out with a chopstick or turning tool.
  • Fold the raw edges of the opening in by 1/4″ and press. Clip the folded edges together and topstitch or whipstitch closed to close the opening. Push the lining down into the bag and you’re done! Fill that cute little zip pouch up with some goodies and it’s ready to be gifted.
Posted on Leave a comment

Total Eclipse Heart Block

Once upon a time, I was falling in love…

I’ve been working so hard on this heart block for you! This pair of hearts is so dear to me because it reminds me of one of my favorite songs (that was released my birth year–how’s that for coincidence?), and I swear, I’ve been singing it all week while I’ve been sewing these 😉 This is a great block to make for your love or your BFF, and you can pick the fabrics to fit each person to make it extra special!

7″ x 12″ Total Eclipse Heart block

You can get your pattern download HERE, and I hope you’ll share your finished block on Instagram using #totaleclipseheartblock . These cute blocks come in three sizes: 5″ x 10″, 7″ x 12″ and 12″ x 12″ for you to customize and make into whatever your heart desires.

If you want a sweet little discount, you can head over to subscribe to my newsletter to grab this one for free! You’ll get a welcome e-mail with your coupon code in it and you can start sewing asap.

Need a little inspiration?

I had so much fun making this block, and I hope you love making it too! I used my new 40th Anniversary Ruby Rotary Cutter from OLFA to cut all my pieces out, and I felt SO fancy 🙂

Posted on Leave a comment

Ringing in 2019 with OLFA

Hey guys!! If you can’t tell from the heading on this post, I’ve got some exciting news to announce! I’m excited to share that I’ll be among a team of greatly talented makers to serve as a 2019 OLFA Ambassador!!! I’m so pumped to share this brand with you. OLFA truly makes the best products with us in mind. Be on the lookout for tips and tricks, and maybe even some great new tutorials coming up in the next few months. I have a fun project coming up in March using OLFA and Aurifil floss and I think you’re going to love it!

Check out the Limited Edition Ruby Anniversary Rotary Cutter that was just released!

If you aren’t familiar with OLFA products, they create some of the most amazing tools like rotary cutters, cutting mats, and rulers, to name a few. When I started sewing about 10 years ago, I was exploring the aisles of my local Joann’s. I was in the scissor aisle and remember seeing rotary cutters for the first time (mind you, I didn’t come from a sewing background!). I remember thinking…why in the world do they have pizza cutters over here in the scissor department? Have these folks lost their minds?? Then, I made my first quilt–I made my own cardstock templates and traced them on each piece of fabric and *GULP* cut all the pieces out by hand with a pair of scissors.

If you’ve been down this road, you know this took literally FOREVER. A few months later, I signed up for my first Craftsy class on machine quilting as you go, and saw a cutting mat and rotary cutter in the background…did some research…and proceeded straight back to that scissor aisle to buy my first OLFA rotary cutter and mat. Once you’ve done something the long and hard way, and you find out there’s been a much better way all along you kind of feel like a fool! But there was so much satisfaction in cutting that first piece of fabric and not having my knuckles kill me from scissor overuse.

OLFA has some great rotary cutters, and the Aqua Splash rotary cutter is my favorite color. I use it daily and it brightens up my cutting area (along with being super cute!)

OLFA Splash Rotary cutter in Aqua

I’m so excited to share this news with you! Can’t wait to share some great projects with you and get sewing 🙂

Posted on Leave a comment

All is Bright Pillow tutorial

All is bright pillow

Are you tired of your throw pillows and need a quick way to freshen up your home dec? Grab a few sewing supplies, a pillow form, and some fabric and you’ll be on your way to piecing and quilting up this simple pillow cover in no time at all! I made my pillow on the Janome MC9400, but it can easily be adapted to work with any sewing machine and it’s helpful if you’ve got a walking foot (or some sort of dual feed device), but not a deal breaker! This tutorial consists of piecing some flying geese units and doing a little straight line quilting to add a modern punch to your home dec. Check out the supply list below, then click on the PDF instructions “All is Bright” below for the complete project.

Supplies

  • Janome HMC9400QCP (or other sewing machine)
  • Janome supplies (or other sewing machine supplies): Dual feed foot holder, Dual Feed Foot AD, 1/4″ Foot, Standard Foot A, Purple Tip Needle, Empty Bobbin, Pre-wound Bobbin
  • 1 FQ bright green floral fabric (fabric A) sub cut into:
    • (4) 2-3/8” square
    • (1) 3-1/2” square
  • 1 FQ true red floral fabric (fabric B) sub cut into:
    • (4) 2-3/8” square
    • (1) 3-1/2” square
  • 1 FQ bright green and true red mix fabric (fabric C) sub cut into:
    • (4) 2-3/8” square
    • (1) 3-1/2” square
  • 1-3/4 yds. light grey patterned fabric (fabric D) sub cut into:
    • (12) 2″ squares
    • (3) 3-1/2” square
    • (1) 18” x 30” (back of the quilted pillow top)
    • (2) 4-1/2” x 6-1/2” (borders)
    • (2) 4-1/2” x 26-1/2” (borders)
    • (2) 13-1/2” x 15” (pillow back)
  • 1 yd. SF101 woven fusible interfacing sub cut into:
    • (2) 13-1/2” x 15”
  • 16” x 28” piece of batting
  • Coordinating all-purpose sewing thread for piecing and quilting
  • 12” x 24” pillow form
  • Other miscellaneous supplies: Spray baste/basting pins, Spray starch, sewing pins, thread snips, marking pen/tailor’s chalk, rotary cutter/ruler/mat, iron and pressing board

Piece the Flying geese units and assemble the pillow (PDF instructions)

All is bright pillow

I can’t wait to see how your pillow turns out! I hope you’ll tag me on Instagram @kustomkwilts when you finish your awesome project 🙂