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How to quilt feathered swirls

how to quilt feathered swirls

Have you ever wanted to combine a couple of different quilting motifs, but didn’t know where to start? In this video tutorial, you’ll learn how to use feathers and swirls together to quilt feathered swirls! Learning how to quilt feathered swirls will give you another great tool for your quilting tool box and you’ll be able to tackle that negative space in your quilt in no time at all!

Video tutorial – how to quilt feathered swirls

Using feathered swirls in you quilt

Here are some examples of quilts I’ve used feathered swirls in. I’m showing my successes and not so successes in these, so you can see how these look in different quilts.

Example quilts

antique quilt
Antique quilt with feathered swirls

This first quilt is an antique quilt that my lovely friend Amy picked up at an estate sale. It was in relatively good condition for being around 80 years old, and it needed a fairly dense all over. The feathered swirls work really well in this top because you can see the quilting, but you also see the quilt first and foremost.

modern quilt
Modern quilt with feathered swirls

This second quilt is a good example of a pattern that is pretty complex and has lots of prints. If I’d had more time, I would have custom quilted this one and used some straight lines and ruler work. You can see the quilting, but it tends to try to compete a little with the fabric and quilt pattern–and that’s not usually the outcome I like to have. Live and learn, right!? Also, I used hot pink thread on this, and a blending thread–maybe a silver would have been a little more subtle.

elephant quilt with feathered swirls

Now this third quilt is the jackpot. The background is a nice light solid, and the quilting motif does a good job of adding texture, but not overdoing it so much that you don’t see the piecing work. My sweet friend Loretta pieced this darling elephant quilt as a baby gift. You can also scale up the design and make it larger so the quilts are more luscious and soft.

Baby quilt

And this fourth example is kind of a mix to me…the pattern is really busy and the fabrics are too. Straight lines would have been superb on this to help the quilt pattern stand out, but the client opted for this motif–which is okay!! She loved the look of it, and it does add a bit of a feminine touch to the quilt. The quilting can’t really be seen in the center, but it is seen on the outer borders where the fabric is more low volume.

Putting it into practice

I hope you’ll take a look at these quilts I’ve used feathered swirls on and take them into consideration when deciding to use feathered swirls. Think about the end product and what the complete quilt will look like. It is a really great fill when using solid fabrics, or filling the space in the background of a block. And it’s perfect for an easy all over that you want to use to add texture.

Have fun with it and go practice those feathered swirls!

Other free motion quilting tutorials

If you like feathered swirls, take a look at the basic components. I did some video tutorials of feathers and swirls separately that you might be interested in before trying this one out. You can see more videos at my youtube channel. Until next time, happy sewing!!

-Joanna

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Moroccan Tiles Summer Sew Along

Are you gearing up for some fun summer sewing? If you’re like me, I like to plan my projects a few weeks in advance so I have time to pick the perfect fabrics. Then there’s no mad dash to gather fabrics and decide on the layout. If you follow along on Instagram, I’ve been posting a lot about the Moroccan Tiles Quilt pattern. Pairing solid fabrics and stripes with this one is so much fun! We really need a new quilt for our bed, so I had planned out the king sized version to make this summer. I thought since I’d already be making one, why not do a fun Moroccan Tiles Summer Sew Along and make one with friends!?

Join in the fun, and if you’re interested, you can RSVP for the sew along here. Emails will go out at the start of each week to remind you of what’s going on that week in the sew along and what the prize is for completing that week’s task. There is a great post about the Moroccan Tiles Quilt that gives video links for tips and tricks, and has some various colorways for inspiration. You can check that out here!

Moroccan Tiles Summer Sew Along Schedule

DATES:
June 1, 2019 – July 12, 2019

Why join a sew along?

When starting a project, motivation to finish is really helpful.  Sewing with a group of quilters and sharing our progress together will give you inspiration and answer any questions you might have while making your quilt.  I like to know when I make a pattern that I’m going to have some help, and sew alongs are a great way to get that support!  This sew along will take place on Instagram using the hashtag #moroccantilessewalong.  Use this hashtag when you post your weekly progress so others can see your awesome progress (and you’ll be able to see what everyone else is doing)! And also…there’s usually a sale!!! Now’s a great time to stock up on patterns and templates 🙂

The Moroccan Tiles Quilt

If you need a little inspiration, check out some of my favorite colorways below!

Not sure you have the skills to make this quilt?

If you are able to sew a consistent 1/4″ seam allowance and cut your fabrics fairly accurately, you’ll be fine!  And if you aren’t comfortable with those things, you’ll never learn if you don’t try.   This pattern might introduce a new skill to you if you’re a beginner–and that’s sewing curves! There are lots of videos ready to help you every step of the way, so you don’t need to sweat it. Sewing curves is super addicting, and once you get started, you might not be able to stop! Sew alongs provide great community for asking questions and discovering new tips and tricks you might not have known before.

What will you learn?

You’ll get to practice your 1/4″ seam allowance AND you’ll learn how to sew curves and fussy cut (if you want to fussy cut–that isn’t a requirement but an added bonus).  You’ll also get tons of inspiration from other participants in the sew along.

What will you need?

Partnering shop

Sew Modern Chicky shop logo

Paula at Sew Modern Chicky has partnered with the Sew Along fun to bring all Moroccan Tiles SAL participants a 15% discount on fabrics purchased from her shop!  She has a great selection of current and modern fabrics, so you’ll want to take advantage of this. Be sure to RSVP to the sew along HERE –the discount to Sew Modern Chicky will only be available in the Sew Along emails.

Sew Modern Chicky is an online and mobile shop that carries a great selection of modern quilting cottons, patterns, and gifts–and orders over $50 ship for FREE!! Sew Modern Chicky is available for retreats, shows, sew-ins, and meetings.

Schedule June 1-July 6, 2019

June 1- 7 Week One:

RSVP for the sew along, gather your pattern, templates, fabrics, and materials and introduce yourself using the hashtag #moroccantilessewalong.  I’ll be randomly picking one winner from week one (you have to post on instagram with the hashtag) to win an awesome prize!

June 8-14 Week Two:

Cut all fabric according to the size you are making. A tutorial on fussy cutting will be provided for this week if you want to use a focal fabric or incorporate stripes into your Moroccan Tiles Quilt.

June 15-21 Week Three: 

Assemble blocks 1-3. I’ll have a fun video tutorial for you on how to piece curves with the option to pin or not pin.

June 22-28 Week Four: 

Assemble blocks 4-6.

June 29-July 5 Week Five:

Assemble blocks 7-9.

July 6-12 Week Six:

Finish your quilt top!

Location

This Sew Along will take place primarily on Instagram, so be sure to follow along on Instagram and use the hashtag #moroccantilessewalong when you post your progress pictures to participate! Instagram now lets you follow hashtags, so you can get inspiration and encouragement from everyone participating.  Don’t worry if you don’t have Instagram.  There will also be weekly emails with photos and tips, and be sure to sign up for the quilt along e-mail updates! (Just a note–there’s a double opt in for the updates, so be sure to check your spam folder, and add me to your address book to make sure you get the updates). Join the Sew along updates if you haven’t!

Rules

There aren’t many rules for this sew along, unless you want to be considered for giveaway prizes.

There will also be some awesome giveaways sprinkled throughout the sew along, so be sure you post one picture to your Instagram account of that week’s progress before the next week’s starting date in order to qualify for prizes (see the schedule above for specific dates). So you would need to post before midnight of the end date-example for the first week: post your photo with the hashtag #moroccantilessewalong by 11:59 PM CST on June 7, 2019.

The giveaway prizes are only for US participants and cannot be shipped outside the US.  Sorry!

Thank you for joining in the fun, and I can’t wait to start sewing with you!  I’ll see you in the Moroccan Tiles sew along!

-Joanna

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How to quilt stacked swirls

how to quilt stacked swirls

Good Monday morning! I’m so excited to share a new video tutorial with you this morning. I just LOVE to quilt stacked swirls in the background of quilt blocks and in negative space. They create amazing texture and fill up a space without a lot of thought and concentration. This video will show you how to quilt stacked swirls and how to navigate to the spaces you want to quilt.

Quilting it

I used Kona Cotton Splash (the Kona color of the year) and white Glide thread by Hab+Dash for high visibility quilting. Typically, I would use a blending thread color when quilting this in the background of a block. I like to use blending threads because I want the quilting to show, but not compete with the design and piecing of the quilt. Contrasting thread colors definitely have their place, and should be used with discretion. After all, this is YOUR quilt, and YOU should get to decide the thread colors, right!?

Check it out 🙂

I hope you’ll take a quick look at this tutorial and see how easy it is to quilt this fill. Quilting round motifs is very simple and repetitive. These are easy to perfect with just a little practice, and you will probably find that you won’t even have to doodle for very long before your swirls look great!

How to quilt swirls video tutorial

Quilts that I’ve used this fill on

I thought I’d show some practical examples of quilts I’ve used this fill on so you can see it in context. Stacked swirls are a great way to add texture without drawing the viewers eye away from the focal point of the piecing on the quilt. Check out some of these quilts I quilted with stacked swirls:

Cheeky Churn Dash

This first quilt is my Cheeky Churn Dash quilt. It’s a great quilt for using layer cakes or 10″ precuts. If you want to really show off a fabric line, this is the perfect pattern for it! You can see that I really love to pair stacked swirls with simple ruler work. You can see the quilting but it doesn’t stand there shouting, “HEY!!! Look at me and not the fabulous quilt!”

As a pattern designer, I would hate for the actual quilt to not be seen for the quilting on it. We spend so much time piecing our quilts that time and thought really needs to go into planning the quilting motifs used. And as a longarm quilter, I love for my quilting to be seen, but not at the expense of the maker’s work. It needs to be an equal relationship where both parts can be valued and appreciated.

Cheeky Churn Dash

Katelen’s Applique

Now below are a couple of pics of my dear friend Katelen P.’s quilt. Katelen is SO talented and creates these amazing appliqued animals. Quilting the stacked swirls behind her applique really makes the animals pop and helps them stay the focal point of the quilt. It’s really important when picking quilt designs that you don’t upstage the maker’s work on the quilt. Quilting is there to help the quilt shine and not overpower it (that’s just MY opinion ;).

Katelens duck

Dreamer’s Star

This is my Dreamer’s Star quilt that I quilted stacked swirls in the background of. The swirls pair so nicely with a little ruler work to really show off the quilt design and the gorgeous fabrics used.

Dreamer’s Star

Above is a close up of the stacked swirls. You can see how much texture it adds without taking away from the quilt design. One of my favorites!!!

I hope you’ll give this motif a try. Quilting stacked swirls is just a breeze, and I know you’ll get in the groove of them in no time! Happy sewing!

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Learn how to quilt swirls – video tutorial

smoky swirls video tutorial

Want to learn how to quilt swirls? Sometimes it’s difficult to determine what should go in the negative space of a quilt. I really like using swirls to quilt empty space because it gives texture and movement. It can also double as smoky swirls or wind looking swirls to create a darker look, or mimic the weather.

When I started out quilting on a domestic machine, my stitches didn’t look precise or smooth–it took a lot of practice and relaxing to get a consistent look and feel. I’ve heard a lot of people say that quilting on a longarm and domestic are completely different, but I feel like they’re very similar and require a similar skill set. If you’re willing to put in the time and practice, you WILL eventually see improvement. I know when I started out, I was easily discouraged at how awesome other quilters’ quilting looked and how crummy mine was in comparison. Over time, my quilting started to look a little better each week and I was satisfied with the quality of quilting I was doing. I doodled a lot to practice when I was away from my machine, and that really helped.

Video tutorial – how to quilt swirls

I made up a fun free motion quilting tutorial on how I quilt these swirls. These are hands down my favorite motif to use to look like wind or smoke on the background of a quilt. I recently quilted a quilt for one of my clients that had a Christmas theme with adorable little houses (Hi Debra!!) and used this motif in the background to look like a little snowstorm. It worked out perfectly and gave just the right feeling to the quilt.

I hope you’ll take a moment to check out the video tutorial. I’ve even put in a little time lapse preview at the beginning so you can see how it comes together quickly. I’ll walk you through how to quilt these swirls. I always recommend to start out with paper and pencil. Then doodle and draw until your swirls look smooth. Once you draw them enough, you don’t really have to think about where you’re going to put the next one. Then it makes quilting them a breeze! Pun intended ;).

So go watch the tutorial a few times. Practice drawing your own swirls. And whether you have a domestic or a longarm, you can quilt up some samples. I’d love to see your quilting if you give it a try!!! Feel free to give me a tag on IG @kustomkwilts if you post your progress :). And if you liked this tutorial, check out how to quilt feathers! Happy quilting!

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Typecast English Paper Piecing

Have you guys seen Sheri of Whole Circle Studio’s newest pattern? It’s called the Typecast of Characters, and it’s an amazingly fun English Paper Piecing pattern that lets you create the entire alphabet and customize it to your heart’s desire. You can snag your copy of the pattern guide and paper packs here.

I am a die hard EPP fan, and I’m always looking for a fun project, especially when it involves hand sewing. I was thrilled to be able to join in Sheri’s blog hop and stitch up the letter “Q”…for Quilt!!! I love to stitch up small projects while I’m on the elliptical because I HATE exercising and it makes the time go by so much faster 😉

Stitching up my first letter

I knew I wanted the letters of my fabric to include some kind of sewing theme, and I stitched up a really cute version for my first Q in pink and aqua. These letters are so addicting, I needed to make another one.

My first letter “Q”

For my second letter…

For my second letter, I wanted to incorporate the letter Q into a mini quilt and do some fun ruler work on my longarm to quilt in some ghost letters. I used a sewing themed low volume paired with KONA’s color of the year-Splash. You can never have enough mini quilts, right? So I prepped all my pieces and glue basted them to the papers that come with Sheri’s pattern. We were just about to pack up the car and make the 14 hour drive to QuiltCon in Nashville, so I was really excited to be able to sew this on the way. I organized each little section with some clover clips and slipped them into my EPP bag before we hit the road.

I took a couple of progress shots along the way, but pictures in the car aren’t ideal. This is one from the first night at our AirBNB in Little Rock that we stopped at on our way to Nashville. It was the cutest little house and perfect for pictures!

I ran into Sheri at QuiltCon and snapped this glamour shot of the two of us with my newly finished “Q” block!

Making the mini quilt

Once I returned from QuiltCon, I added some fabric to the top, bottom, and sides of the Q and loaded it on my longarm. I quilted up some fun interwoven straight lines and used a stencil I made to quilt around the ghost letters. I really love how it turned out and can’t wait to hang it up over my sewing machine. I think I need to make my daughter a cool sign with her name in it next 🙂 !

I’ve loved sharing this project with you and I hope you’ll check out Sheri’s fantastic pattern. You can pick up your copy of the pattern guide and paper packs for all the letters at Sheri’s website. Don’t forget to check out all the other letters in the Typecast of Characters by the other makers! Happy sewing 😉

Catch up on the other makers in the Typecast tour:


TYPECAST OF CHARACTERS BLOG TOUR hosted by Whole Circle Studio:
• Wednesday, March 27: Tour Introduction by Whole Circle Studio
• Monday, April 1 — A: Kate Brennan of Aurifil
• Tuesday, April 2 — B: Mathew Bourdreaux of Mister Domestic
• Wednesday, April 3 — C: Tara Curtis of Wefty Needle
• Thursday, April 4— D: Leah Day of Free Motion Quilting Project
• Friday, April 5 — Week 1 Wrap Up featuring A-D and GIVEAWAY at Whole Circle Studio
• Monday, April 8 — E: Jess Finn of Paper Pieces
• Tuesday, April 9 — F: Sylvia Schaefer of Flying Parrot Quilts
• Wednesday, April 10 — G: Giuseppe Ribaudo of Giucy Giuce
• Thursday, April 11— H: Hilary Jordan of By Hilary Jordan
• Friday, April 12 — Week 2 Wrap Up featuring E-H and GIVEAWAY at Whole Circle Studio
• Monday, April 15 — I: Kim Soper of Leland Ave Studios
• Tuesday, April 16 — J: Yvonne Fuchs of Quilting Jetgirl
• Wednesday, April 17 — K: Karen O’Connor of Lady K Quilts
• Thursday, April 18 — L: Kristy Daum of St. Louis Folk Victorian
• Friday, April 19 — Week 3 Wrap Up featuring I-L and GIVEAWAY at Whole Circle Studio
• Monday, April 22 — M: Molli Sparkles of Molli Sparkles
• Tuesday, April 23 — N: Nicole Daksiewicz of Modern Handcraft
• Wednesday, April 24 — O: Scott Hansen of Blue Nickel Studios
• Thursday, April 25 — P: Pat Sloan of Pat Sloan
• Friday, April 26 — Week 4 Wrap Up featuring M-P and GIVEAWAY at Whole Circle Studio
• Monday, April 29 — Q: Joanna Marsh of Kustom Kwilts
• Monday, April 29 — Q: Lindsay Széchényi of Lindsay Széchényi (and Patchwork Threads)
• Tuesday, April 30 — R: Andrea Tsang Jackson of 3rd Story Workshop
• Wednesday, May 1 — S: Sarah Thomas of Sariditty
• Thursday, May 2 — T: Rachel Rossi of Rachel Rossi
• Friday, May 3— Week 4 Wrap Up featuring Q-T and GIVEAWAY at Whole Circle Studio
• Monday, May 6 — U: Kitty Wilkin of Night Quilter
• Tuesday, May 7 — V: Jenn McMillan of Fabric, Ink
• Wednesday, May 8 — W: Jenny Meeker of Bobbin Roulette Studio
• Thursday, May 9 — X: Stephanie Kendron of Modern Sewciety
• Friday, May 10 — Week 5 Wrap Up featuring U-X and GIVEAWAY at Whole Circle Studio
• Monday, May 13 — Y: Debby Brown of Debby Brown Quilts
• Tuesday, May 14 — Z: Nisha Bouri and Kim Martucci of Brimfield Awakening
• Wednesday, May 15 — Week 6 Wrap Up featuring Y-Z, Tour closeout and GIVEAWAY at Whole Circle Studio

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How to quilt feathers – video tutorial

Have you ever been at a loss for how to fill negative space in a quilt? I know I’ve sometimes struggled with what quilting motif is the right one, and I wanted to share some of the fills I use the most. I made a quick video tutorial on how to quilt feathers and I think you’ll really love some of the tips I give in it 🙂

How to quilt feathers

how to quilt feathers

I love quilting feathers. They add so much movement and texture and fill a space quickly. When I first started quilting, I had a hard time quilting feathers. They came out ugly and wonky and wobbly. So I decided to stop wasting so much fabric and grabbed some scratch paper and just drew them over and over again. They were still ugly and inconsistent, but I could gradually see some progress. It seemed like one day, it just clicked, and my feathers suddenly looked like feathers. I was happy that I only drew on paper and didn’t go through that much fabric, batting, and thread before my feathers started coming together!

Putting needle to fabric

Once you’re confident that you’re ready to start quilting, grab some fabric, batting, and a good contrasting thread so you can have better visibility while you quilt. I think it’s easier in the beginning to mark the spines of your feathers, and even mark some of the feathers so you have some guidelines. I like to use a chaco liner or some sort of white chalk marker that easily rubs away or wipes off. Practice is definitely going to be your friend, and if you can just quilt feathers for an entire afternoon, you’ll really begin to see a lot of progress between your ending feathers and what you started with.

I hope you’ll check out the video tutorial I created to help you quilt one of my favorite motifs. You can click on the video below, or follow this link to see the video on youtube.

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Honest Fabric Designs – Moroccan Tiles

I’m so excited to finally share some news with you!! I’ve joined the fabulous designers at Honest Fabric to bring you some vibrant custom printed whole cloth quilt tops!! I know some people think piecing curves is a real bummer (it’s really SO much fun!!). So if that’s you–and you’ve been dying to get your hands on a Moroccan Tiles Quilt, you’re in luck. You can head over to Honest Fabric and choose from 6 different color ways, in three different sizes. I;m so exited to finally share these Honest Fabric Designs with you!

Honest Fabric – Moroccan Tiles wholecloth quilts

There are 6 unique colorways for this design and I just LOVE how they turned out. Honest Fabric is having a sale through May 31 so you can pick up any of these awesome designs for 25% off with code 25off. A few months ago, I ordered some before I was a contributor from my friend Nelson Salsa. I picked up his “Tilt” design so I could try out some new quilting designs. I also bought Kwik Color Washed Diamonds by Karie Jewell, Fox Dreams and River Walk by Anne Sullivan.

These designs are going to be so much fun to quilt up, and it takes the stress off and just lets me quilt without worrying about spending so much time piecing. All the designs I purchased from other Honest designers don’t currently have patterns out to piece them, so I would otherwise miss out on having a piece of the great artwork from these designers.

I’m really happy with the quality of the printed fabric that Honest Fabric delivers. The fabric is soft and supple and colorfast. I’ve quilted up one of Karlee Porter’s designs that I purchased called Explosion.

honest fabric

I did some graffiti style quilting on Karlee’s whole cloth design and used Quilter’s Dream Wool batting to really make the quilting POP. It was SO much fun to quilt, and I didn’t have to worry about bulky seams or any of the piecing! It was heaven.

Karlee's design exlposion

Anyhow, I hope you’ll check out some of the creative designs over at Honest Fabric. Take a break from piecing to quilt up some of these amazing printed quilt tops. Have fun, and happy sewing!

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Binding on the Longarm

Do you follow me on instagram? If you do, you might have seen I’ve been having a LOT of fun with videos lately. I’ve been doing some time lapse videos of some basic straight line quilting AAAAAND decided I’d do a real time video of how I bind mini quilts on my longarm. It’s seriously so easy that if you haven’t tried this yet, you’ll really kick yourself!

If you’ve ever quilted a mini quilt on the longarm, there’s a fun shortcut you can use to quickly attach binding to the front of the quilt after you quilt it. I did a short video tutorial showing how to attach binding on the longarm, and I hope you’ll go check it out! Now just a quick note…I am obviously not a professional videographer…or whatever that’s called, and I even treat you to a view of my gorgeous locks of hair that were quickly and haphazardly thrown up into a very unglamorous mom bun. That’s right. ENJOOOOOY 😉

When I bind my quilting samples on the longarm, I usually stick to pretty small sizes. You could definitely do this with a large quilt, just keep in mind that you’ll be doing some scrolling and advancing of the quilt to finish the job. It’s also a good idea to mark the large quilt so you have a good idea of where the squared portion of the quilt will be so you attach the binding straight. I only do this for quilts that are for myself–because for me this is something to do quickly as a shortcut and not great for accuracy, as I don’t spend a lot of time making sure I’m putting the binding on squarely.

To make the binding, I cut strips 2.5″ wide x the width of the fabric and then sew them together, end to end to create the length I need (I usually do the perimeter of the quilt + 12″ to make sure I have enough). The tutorial shows how to attach the binding to the front of the quilt. After quilting, you’ll need to trim away and square up, then flip the folded edge of the binding to the back and finish. I finish all mine by hand because I’m a weirdo and love hand binding!

Freshly bound mini quilt!

Binding on the longarm details

I’m using an Innova 22″ longarm (hand guided) with a lightning stitch stitch regulator. The fabric panel I quilted was a custom panel I ordered from My Fabric Design, and the thread I used for the quilting was Glide by Hab+Dash (previously Fil-Tec). If you’d like to see a time lapse video of the quilting of this panel, you can check it out on instagram HERE.

I hope you find this tutorial helpful–and I’d love to hear your feedback! Are you up for trying this out soon? Let me know if you do and how it goes! Happy sewing 🙂

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Easy Zip Pouch Tutorial

OLFA is celebrating their 40th Anniversary this year and has teamed up with Aurifil to create the Slice and Stitch Challenge! I was asked to be part of the challenge, and I’m so excited to included in this talented group of makers, showing you how to use handy tools to create things you’ll love :). I don’t know about you, but if you sneak into my sewing room, you’re sure to find several OLFA tools (and cutting mats) and LOTS of yummy Aurifil thread. Some of my favorite (and quite possibly underappreciated) tools are specialty rotary cutter blades. You can (carefully) pop one of these blades into your regular rotary cutter and quickly achieve a decorative finish that will look like it took you forever to cut…but that can be our little secret! I also just LOVE the new OLFA RUBY rotary cutter…I use it daily (photos below are from OLFA’s website). For the Slice and Stitch challenge, I saw those decorative blades paired with Aurifloss and knew immediately I just had to make a zip pouch!

You can see the dreamy Aurifloss colors I chose for the hand quilting on my zip pouch. Love those blues with a punch of bright colors! Let’s get moving and start sewing up your own zip pouch!

Exact Aurifloss colors are listed below

Supplies needed:

  • Zip pouch template, printed at 100%
  • 10″ zipper
  • Aurifloss in your favorite colors (I used #1320 Bright teal, 2225 Salmon, 2220 Light salmon, 4020 Fucshia, 5005 Bright turquoise, 2735 Medium blue, 1147 Leaf green, and 4644 Smoke blue)
  • OLFA 45 mm Wave rotary blade and OLFA 45 mm Deluxe Handle Rotary Cutter
  • (2) 2.5″ x 9.5″ pieces of cork leather
  • Hand quilting needle
  • 1 FQ lining fabric, sub cut into
    • (2) 6.5″ x 9.5″
  • 1 FQ Solid fabric for the exterior, sub cut into
    • (2) 6.5″ x 9.5″
  • (2) 8″ x 11″ pieces of batting
  • Binding Clips
  • Turning tool (optional)
  • Basting spray/safety pins
  • Chalk marker or Hera marker
  • Zipper foot, sewing machine
  • Thread for piecing and basic sewing supplies
  • Iron and pressing mat

Hand Quilt it!

To begin, you’ll need to take the two exterior pieces of fabric cut at 6.5″ x 9.5″ and center each one on top of a piece of batting. Use a Hera marker or chalk pencil to mark your hand quilting lines, then hand quilt a pattern or random stitches onto each exterior piece. I like to make my stitches about 1/4″ in length, and spaced the same distance apart.

Grab your template:

Now you’ll take the cork pieces, and the bottom portion of the template printed from your supply list and line the template up along the bottom 9.5″ of the cork. Use a standard OLFA 45 mm Rotary blade to trim along the curved edge. I used my OLFA Ruby Rotary Cutter for this part. Once you’ve trimmed the curved portion, take the Wave Rotary blade and trim just along the curved edge to leave a cute wavy edge.

Take one of the quilted exterior pieces and place the decorative cork on the bottom 9.5″ edge. Use clips to hold in place, or use some wash away hem tape to secure. At this point, I like to take an air erasable marker and echo the line of the wave just below the wavy edge of the cork – about 1/8″ from the curvy edge – as a stitching guide. Take this piece to the sewing machine and topstitch along the guideline you drew with a coordinating thread. Then stitch around the remaining edges of the cork, about 1/8″ away from the raw edge to secure it in place. Don’t worry — the cork won’t fray, so it’s great for special decorative finishes with the OLFA rotary cutter!

Take your zipper and place it lined up with the top edge of one exterior, as shown in the picture below. Mark the end of the zipper (the end with the metal stopper) where it meets the end of the right side of the fabric, then mark about 1/4″ in from that mark as well. Take the zipper to the sewing machine and use a zig zag stitch to sew a new zipper stop on the mark furthest in. Trim away the rest of the zipper on the outermost mark.

Install the zipper

Take the newly trimmed down zipper and place it RSD on top of one side of the hand quilted exterior. Use binding clips to clip the zipper in place. Take one of the lining pieces and place it RSD on top of the zipper, the replace the clips to include all three layers. Use a zipper foot to sew through the three layers with a 1/4″ seam allowance, beginning at one end of the fabric and sewing to the opposite end, all the way to the edge of the fabric.

Press the lining and exterior away from the zipper with your iron, and topstitch 1/8″ away from the folded edge of the fabric.

Repeat the steps above with the remaining exterior and lining pieces.

Assembling the zip pouch

Open the zipper part way, then match the exteriors, placing them right sides together. Pull the linings together and match them, right sides together. Pin or clip in place, and mark about a 5″ opening along the bottom center of the lining to leave open in the next step. Pull the zipper pieces towards the lining, as shown below.

Sew all the way around the perimeter of the zipper pouch, leaving the 5″ opening unsewn. Clip the corners for crisp turning. Turn the zipper pouch right side out through the opening in the lining. You can use a turning tool for crisper turning, if needed. Fold the opening of the lining in 1/4″ and press. Clip in place. Topstitch the opening closed, then push the lining down inside the pouch.

And you’re done! Fill this pretty pouch up with all the sewing things you need on the go 🙂

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Moroccan Tiles PDF Quilt Pattern Release

You guys! Today is the day for the Moroccan Tiles Quilt Pattern release!!! I don’t know if I’ve ever been as excited about a quilt pattern as I am about this one. I’m hoping to have all the beds in our house decked out with this quilt be the end of the year!

Check out some of my favorite color ways!

The Moroccan Tiles PDF Quilt Pattern includes these features:

  • Clear instructions and fabric requirements for baby, throw, twin, queen, and king quilt sizes
  • Coloring page to help plan your quilt
  • Step-by-step instructions with pictures to guide you through
  • Instructional videos for piecing curves and using the templates
  • Instructions and diagrams for piecing quilt backs for all sizes
  • Pattern includes printable templates for easy cutting
  • The option to purchase acrylic templates separately

I designed this quilt when I was pregnant with our little girl, Gemma. It’s been a labor of love for me and I can’t even tell you how many colorways I went through. Sometimes I dream that there are 40 hours in a day so I could make each and every one (hey, I can dream, right?).

Chain piecing some curves 🙂

Moroccan Tiles is a modern quilt using straight lines and curves to create a tile-work quilt with a big impact. I love how much the quilt changes when you alter the colors, or fussy cut some stripes to play with the pattern. This pattern is for confident beginners to intermediate sewists, due to the curves in the quilt. Okay, I know I might have sent you running for the hills when I threw in that word “curves”, but I hope you won’t let that scare you away from making your own Moroccan Tiles! I’ve made several videos to go with this pattern to help you on your curve-sewing journey (the link to each video is in the pattern). You can take a peek HERE. There are 5 different videos to offer any extra assistance you might need if you’re a beginner (you can still watch them if you’re not a beginner 😉

Video previews

Since there are curves in this quilt, the pattern includes paper templates you can print with it. If that isn’t your jam, you can purchase acrylic templates for the quilt here (they’ll ship mid-March). If you’ve never used acrylic templates before, I’ve got a video to show you how:

And if you plan on fussy cutting your fabrics for your quilt, it will be easier to do so with the Acrylic Templates. The templates are transparent, so you can easily see where you’re cutting the print you want to stand out. The stripes on the Moroccan Tiles quilt pictured above were fussy cut (fussy cut means to cut the fabric with intention, being mindful of the orientation of the print). I can help with fussy cutting if you’ve never done that before–in this video:

And then I’ve got a couple of other videos to help you with the basics of sewing curves. If you click on the first video in this post, it will link to the entire playlist and show you all 5 videos that accompany this pattern. I think you’ll find them very helpful, and if you still have questions, you can always ask!

I’ve made up a couple of different colorways that I really love, and if you need some extra inspiration, you can check them out:

The Moroccan Tiles quilt pattern and acrylic templates (along with all other quilt patterns in my shop) will be on sale from February 28, 2019 through March 7, 2019, and the acrylic templates will ship mid-March. I can’t wait to see your Moroccan Tiles quilt, and I hope you’ll share with me via email or using the hashtag #moroccantilesquilt

Happy sewing, friends!!!